Articles Tagged ‘Town of North Hempstead’

Darren Major, left, and his husband Andrew Troup pose for a photograph Thursday June 30, 2011 in New York.  The couple, who live in New York, were legally wed in Canada in 2008.   As gay marriage becomes legal in New York, companies and individuals are wrestling with changes to their financial lives.   Gay couples who get married can file jointly on state returns but not federal. Big corporations that extend benefits to domestic partners must decide whether to continue in light of the new state law. That means some couples might have to head to the altar to maintain their benefits. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)

Gay Couples Hours Away from Marriage on Long Island

Same-sex couples taking advantage of both the Town of North Hempstead and Brookhaven’s one-day offer to open their clerk offices on Sunday are less than…



Paola Perez, left, and her partner Linda Collazo, dressed as bride and groom, march in the annual Gay Pride parade in Greenwich Village, Sunday, June 26, 2011 in New York. One of the world's oldest and largest gay pride parades was expected to become a victory celebration Sunday after New York's historic decision to legalize same-sex marriage.  The law signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Friday doesn't take effect for 30 days. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Town of Brookhaven to Offer Marriage Licenses Sunday

The town of Brookhaven will open their clerk’s office on…



Cedar Creek Spared Great Neck’s Sewage

Resolving a seven-year tug-of-war over the best way to comply with state and federal environmental laws while dealing with several million gallons of sewage, Great Neck and its surrounding areas’ residents produce on a daily basis—in the most cost-efficient way—North Hempstead Supervisor Jon Kaiman and the Town Board unanimously approved a $60 million bond resolution Nov. 17 to upgrade an existing wastewater facility and decommission another.

The result will be a new, environmentally friendly state-of-the-art tertiary sewage treatment plant that will utilize cutting-edge technology, including an oxidation ditch, slash nitrogen emissions into the Long Island Sound, while simultaneously saving costs and consolidating services throughout the Great Neck peninsula, say proponents.



Undressing The Emperor

Eight years as mayor of Glen Cove, eight years as Nassau County Executive. In stark contrast to Long Island’s lone daily newspaper’s recent resounding endorsement of Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi for what would be his third term as the county’s top elected official (an endorsement which failed to mention the nearly $200,000 in campaign contributions Newsday’s parent company Cablevision, its political action committee and owners, the Dolan family, have donated to his political aspirations since 2006, according to New York State [NYS] Board of Elections financial disclosure records), we at the Press thought we’d be a little more judgmental rather than hand out a free pass.



Strawberry Fields For-Never

Philip Tavella had big plans for Cedar Creek Park.

The financial consultant-turned-developer from Massapequa envisioned new athletic fields, a miniature golf course, driving range, an indoor recreational “sportsplex” center and go-cart tracks, among other new facilities at the 259-acre county park that borders Wantagh and Seaford.

For the past four years, Tavella says, he’s been the director of the nonprofit Darryl Strawberry Foundation. The project at Cedar Creek would feature continuous programs for children like his son, who has special needs.

The total price tag for his dream: $26 million, he tells the Press, all to be financed by himself and four private companies, whom he declines to name. The cost to taxpayers, he says: zero. And it wouldn’t affect operations at the park for regular users one bit, he says.

“We don’t take away 1 percent of any public usage on that park,” says Tavella. “We would be increasing public usage of the park.”

But not everyone shares Tavella’s vision.

Although already shelved by the Suozzi administration due to lack of public input, Tavella’s plans have ignited a firestorm of controversy among environmentalists, residents, civic leaders and lawmakers from the area not quick to be extinguished, with its recent culmination a public meeting held at Wantagh High School on Oct. 21 in which participants called for a permanent moratorium on development projects within the park.